Name: Dr Marcus Brown

Web Site: http://novacatclinic.com/

Bio:

Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners' 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

NOVA Cat Clinic
923 N. Kenmore St.
Arlington VA 22201

Phone: 703-525-1955
Fax: 703-525-1957
Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
Facebook: Profile Page
Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    What should I feed my Cat?

    January 26th, 2014

    We always get dietary questions. One of the most common is “Does dry food make cats fat?” “Is canned food better for cats than dry?” With everything about diet, there is never a simple answer.

    Dry food has the advantage for those of us that live with cats that it has preservative and can be left out without fear of spoilage. Canned food on the other hand does not have preservative and does not do well once the can is opened. One of the basic facts is that canned food is calorically harder to over feed than dry food. Most cats need between 200 and 250 kcal/day. Most 5.5 oz cans of cat food have 195 kcals.

    Many dry foods have upwards of 550 kcal/cup. A 1/2 cup of food looks like very little to most people’s eye. Dry is extremely easy to overfeed. Cats like the texture and taste so they will eat whatever is put in front of them. Getting twice you daily caloric need is an easy way to gain weight.

    Cats naturally spend a lot of energy to get their calories. Mouse has about 50 kcals and cats eat anywhere from 4-5/day. It takes a cat about 5 tries to catch a mouse. Once they do, nap time. The process starts again. Pretty exciting life don’t you agree?

    Now lets go inside to a cozy apartment. There is an over abundance of food and no work or stimulation to acquire it. Makes for a great recipe to gain weight. There are certainly other differences between canned and dry, but I am only looking at the caloric aspect at this point.

    Whatever method of feeding you choose, remember the calorie count. Try to get your cat 5 or more small meals per day. Technology and automatic feeders can be your best friend. If you choose to feed dry, use a measuring cup. If canned is easier, you may want to consider a feeder so that your cat can get a mid day meal.

    One very important criterion is to monitor you cat’s progress. Be sure and ask you veterinarian for more details and help for your cat’s specific nutritional needs.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    Ways to Medicate Your Cat

    October 17th, 2013

    I enjoyed reading Dr Ray’s post on medicating cats. It is always good when a veterinarian has first hand experience with medicating a cat – a task that is often a lesson in humility. My least favorite situation is the “I cannot catch you because you are hiding under the bed or behind the refrigerator.”

    I often cringe when I hear “my husband grabs her and wraps her in a towel and after 3 attempts I finally get the pill in her.” I definitely would not want to be the source of that cat’s unhappiness; I would try and get my cat to agree with the medicating – especially critical for chronic medications. Easier said then done, right?

    Dr Ray mentioned putting the medication in food but due to their keen sense of taste, and smell, that can prevent them from eating. We definitely don’t want that! Imagine someone putting something bitter in your food – would you eat it?

    Pill pockets can be very helpful – until the day your cat says that was great for 8 months, but no thanks, I’m good, how about some of that yummy tuna instead.

    The other hardship to consider is cutting tiny pills in quarters. With some of the extremely small medications this can be disastrous. With one pill, instead of 4 doses you get 2.

    So when your cat says “no thank you” or you cannot cut the pills small enough, consider having a pharmacist compound the medication. Pretty simple, huh? Compounded medications are made to order only for your cat; it has become controversial since the issues at the New England Pharmacy. Congress is working on legislation to protect both humans and animals.

    Medications can be made into such forms as: treats, liquids, or capsules. A very select few can even be made into transdermal gels. Your cat gets to decide what form he/she prefers.

    So don’t despair, be sure and tell your veterinarian that you need help getting medications in to your cat. Trust me on this, we are here to help!

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    End of Life and Quality of Life

    July 7th, 2013

    I would like to thank everyone for their kind wishes and moral support for Cosmo. If you would like to read more about him please click here for part one and here for part two.

    He just turned 12 years old last week and has started acting very needy.  He has been screaming for attention at all hours of the day.  This is a little different than his normal behavior.  I petted him under the chin and noticed that he had small bumps that were not there a week ago.  His lymph node on the right shoulder is now enlarged.

    I am planning on taking samples to prove that it is the return of the cancer.  I feel certain that is.

    I am now at the crossroads of how do I proceed.  This is obviously a very aggressive cancer since it returned only 3 months after treatment.

    Do I take him back for more surgery and treatment?  That option does not make sense since he has been through so much by this time and it will last less time than the previous.

    Do I treat him as “hospice”?  I give him pain medication waiting until he stops eating and his quality of life is terrible.

    I do not want him to reach the point of terrible quality of life.  I will need to make my decision of the correct time.  I have always told people that they will know the time.  I wish not to be selfish and keep him alive for my sake or for that of others.  This is a family decision.

    He has been such a good friend and want to be respectful and say good bye before he is suffering.

    Many thanks for everyone’s support and kindness.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
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    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    How to Properly Restrain a Cat

    May 5th, 2013

    I was describing “respectful” feline handling to a group of people.  The most common question was, “What?! You are not suppose to scruff cats? That’s how their mother’s disciplined them when they were kittens”

    Great place to start.  Mother cats do carry their kitten by the scruff.  They do not discipline them in this manner.

    With some cats, this restraining manner can have the opposite desired effect.  There are other more respectful methods and scruffing should be a last resort.  Having your body weight dangled does not make good common sense.

    Most of us do not need to restrain their cats at home. Occasionally it is necessary for medical care or nail trimming.  Towels are an excellent method of restraining.  When we use this at the clinic we call it a “purrito.”

    There were also questions about how to “punish” a cat for “bad” behavior. Cats on a whole respond better to leaning with positive reinforcement.  Yelling and punishment teach your cat nothing and may be counter productive.

    Most of the “bad” cat behaviors that occur at home are normal for cats. Unfortunately the cat’s human companions are not always appreciative of these behaviors.

    One of the most important aspects of working with your cat is for you to go outside your human box and think like a cat.  Not easy, but not impossible.  You will be amazed at how more enriched your life and relationship with your cat will become.

    Resources:

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    A Quick Cosmo Update

    April 5th, 2013

    If you missed it read about Cosmo’s Big Adventure

    Prior to starting radiation he had to have CT scan to determine the plan where he would receive his radiation therapy.  So, no food after midnight since he would have anesthesia.  Always harder than it sounds with 3 cats.

    We were up early and Cosmo was then placed in the carrier.  He has always been good about this and I grateful that we started early in life.  The other 2 are then easily fed. I get a call that all went well.  The CT is sent to Calgary for the radiologist to make the plan. A week later we get a call and they are ready to start at any time.

    So now it begins., 18 treatments in total.  18 anesthesias.  Sounds overwhelming.  My main issue would be getting him to the facility in the morning and then getting him in the evening.  With my schedule I do not usually leave until 8 in the evening.  Fortunately, the center can keep him overnight.  I am so grateful since we only have about 2 awake hours together. We will start on a Wednesday and finish on a Friday 2 weeks later.

    They do not do treatments on the weekend so on Friday I go get him.  I was told to be prepared that the radiation could burn his neck and he might not be able to eat.  Cosmo is one of those cats that lives to eat.  If he did get burned, he might need a feeding tube.  This would have to be tube directly into his stomach and not his neck due to the location of the treatment.

    I get him and am prepared for the worst. Happily I had worried needlessly.  He gets home and goes straight for the food bowl. Same old Cosmo especially after he goes and bugs his sister.  Sunday night it will start all over again.  No food after midnight.

    Fortunately the next 2 weeks go very well with no issues.  On his last night, he was given a scarf that he graduated from radiation therapy.  I liked the scarf better than he did, but was so grateful for all the good care he received.

    Towards the end of treatment, I spoke with his oncologist.  I learned that cats have far fewer issues with radiation than humans.  I also learned that dogs have much harder time than humans.  We also discussed since we had come this far we might want to consider chemotherapy for Cosmo also.  This would be the last step and would be done 3 weeks apart.  The first one would happen during the last week of treatment.  I decide to go ahead given that we had come this far.  He needed blood work to be sure that he had enough white blood cells.

    I will keep you posted on how he handles this part of his adventure.  He seems to be enjoying himself and loves seeing people at the clinic.  At this moment, I am happy with my decision since Cosmo seems to be very happy with it.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    How to Tell When a Cat is in Pain

    December 1st, 2012

    I was asked the other day how can you tell when a cat is in pain.  As I sit here with my left foot wrapped in a bandage and throbbing, I think what a great question.

    Anyone who looks at me can tell that I am uncomfortable and in pain.  But when my 18 year old cat has a hard time getting up on the bed is he in pain?

    So we need to go back to how humans evolved and how cats evolve.  Early humans formed groups to help each other hunt and protect themselves.  With my swollen foot, I would not be much help and could actually alert predators to our location. It is good thing that everyone can tell I am not up to speed and that I should stay home.

    Cats evolved as solitary hunters.  They did not hunt in groups.  They are small prey to larger animals.  Their strategy of looking like they are on top of the world was a great one.

    In modern times, this strategy makes it extremely challenging to tell when our cats need our help. Many times there is not a clue until things are very advanced.

    As veterinarians, we know that surgery is painful.  We treat preemptively and ensure that our patients do not sure any hurt. This seems to be a smart and reasonable thing to do and we can use many of the techniques that are used for humans.

    What about chronic pain?  This is where it gets harder.  First, it is challenging to see the pain because of that solitary hunter strategy.

    Sometimes if things seem different – such as not getting on the bed. Other signs could be not using the litter box. You may want to discuss trying pain management for your cat.

    Contact your veterinarian to find out about all the different modalities available to help your cat be pain free.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
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    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    How do Indoor Cats Get Worms? And Can They Get Worms from Eating Flies?

    September 12th, 2012

    That is a great question from one of our readers.

    I have 3 indoor cats and live on the 8tth floor of a high rise. Do I worry about them getting worms?  I take the proper precautions to make sure that they do not get parasites. They are currently on a monthly topical preventative.  However, Indoor cats can get parasites from insects. The insects can run across their food or the cats can eat them. These insects can have the parasite eggs on their legs. Some insects or other animals such as snails can be vectors for parasites.  In other words, the parasites live part of their life cycle in these animals.

    I have a very responsible client who has a cat that got lungworms in suburban Virginia.  He responded beautifully from deworming. He came to us coughing and looking like he was going was on death’s door.  He had lost 2 pounds.  His radiographs looked like either asthma or cancer.  It was terrible. Fortunately, he responded beautifully to 10 days of Panacur, deworming.  He is normal with no coughing after treatment.

    Parasites have developed great survival strategies. Over millions of years they have worked on these sneaky mechanisms of survival.  The Companion Parasites Animal Council (CAPC) has great recommendations on how to protect yourself and your family. They recommend twice yearly deworming for indoor only cats.

    These parasites could potentially infect your children, BUT with proper easy deworming this can be easily prevented.  A relationship with your veterinarian is your first defense.  As veterinarians we are here to help you tailor your cat’s medical needs to you and your cat’s lifestyle.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    When is the Best Time to Neuter/Spay my Cat?

    August 26th, 2012

    When I was growing up in the 60’s, over 6 months or after they have had one litter was considered the best answer. How times have changed.

    The main benefit of neutering prior to puberty is no new kittens. Another benefit to the cat is a decrease in the incident of breast cancer.

    Neutering and spaying decreases the spread of Feline Leukemia and FIV. Feline Leukemia is spread from mother to kittens – so if there are no new kittens, the spread of Feline Leukemia decreases. FIV is spread from fighting. Neutering decreases aggression and fighting. Here is more information about the benefits of neutering/spaying.

    But what about urinary problems?  If they are neutered too early will this be a problem?  Fortunately studies have shown there is no increased risk. Some veterinarians are neutering as early 2 months.

    The following is a provocative link about early neutering. I like how it challenges our perception of our kittens. I would love to hear what you think of this approach. Word of warning – there is a dog scene. If you are offended, you may want to jump to the second half of the video. Watch the video now.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    Is My Cat Driving Me Crazy?

    July 7th, 2012

     

    Dear Dr. Brown;

    My boyfriend sent me this article today… can you please address when you have a moment?

    Many thanks,

    Robin : )

     

    Thank you for the question Robin. There have been many sensationalize eye-catching headlines about this (This seems to be the next zombie apocalypse). It is always important to separate the science from the hysteria. No one wants to contract a parasite.

    The current literature states that Toxoplasma, defined by NIH and the Mayo Clinic, is of concern only for pregnant women and immune suppressed people. For most everyone else, the infection is latent and does not cause any problems.

    There have been 3 recent articles that have fanned fears about toxoplasmosis. We have to remember that the work on this will be continuing and these studies need to be reviewed and duplicated.

    1. The first study is a rat study from Stanford and postulated that Toxoplasmosis can affect the behavior of rats.
      Read the article →
    2. The second study is from the University of Maryland.  It is a retrospective study of 45,000 Danish women and suicide rates.
      Read the article →
    3. The third article is from Atlantic Monthly and it features a Czech biologist who feels that Toxoplasmosis may alter human behavior.  All of these are provocative and make for great headlines.  Time will tell and more study will show if there is a correlation.
      Read the article →

    The best way to prevent any problems is to avoid infection:

    • Most people get Toxoplasmosis from improperly cooked meat. The CDC recommends cooking meat properly. I am providing a link to the CDC to help define properly cooked meat.
    • Freezing meet to sub-zero temperatures for several days decreases the chances for infection.
    • Always be sure to peel and wash fruits and vegetable before eating.
    • Be sure to washing cutting boards and utensils with hot soapy water after contact with raw meat, or unwashed fruits or vegetables.
    • Wash your hands frequently.

    What about my cat?

    If you feed commercially prepared or cooked foods it decreases your cat’s chances of becoming exposed to Toxoplasmosis.  Keeping your cat indoors also decreases his/her chance of acquiring the parasite.

    Cats are the definitive host for Toxoplasmosis or to borrow from Dr Robert Yolken from Johns Hopkins University.  The world for the parasite is divided into two parts – Cats and Non-Cats.

    Toxoplasma wants to be in cats because it leads its entire lifecycle in cats, but not in non-cats.  Again from Dr Yolken – “Now toxoplasma gets into another animal, it’s still alive, but it’s not very happy. What I’m fond of saying is that it’s kind of like a young person living in New Jersey. The person is alive but perhaps would rather be somewhere else… so in New York City or Philadelphia or Washington. Somewhere…”

    My apologies to any readers in the Garden State.

    Cats only shed the Toxoplasmosis eggs one week in their entire lives.  The eggs need 48 hours to “hatch”.  Frequent cleaning of the litter box with gloves can help decrease the chance of getting infected.  Washing your hands is very important.

    Hopefully some common sense and good hygiene habits will help protect you from many pathogens.  It seems to come down to all the good habits you were taught, as child will help protect you.

    Separating the facts from fiction or pseudoscience is very important to eliminate needless fear.

    You can read the full NPR interview here.

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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    Petting Induced Aggression

    May 8th, 2012

    I recently received the following question:

    Why do cats completely flip out when you scratch their backs right above the tail? Our cat acts like she loves/hates it and is about to have a seizure every time.
    – E. Rich

    This could be a very normal reaction for your cat.  Some cats will develop “pet induced aggression” when they are petted for too long.  It can be on any part of the body. It is usually the head, the belly, or the tail base.  The best way to avoid this is to pet them only when you initiate the petting NOT when they come to be petted.

    This could also be a sign of pain from arthritis or a neurological condition.  You veterinarian could best determine this with a video of the action.  Sometimes a radiograph of the area can be very helpful to determine if arthritis is involved. If this is the issue, mediations or a special diet may be extremely helpful.

    In summary, it may be behavioral and minor modifications may be the solution.  Videoing of the incident may be very helpful to your veterinarian.  If it is a physical problem, other diagnostics and medications may be the answer.  In either instant, visiting a veterinarian should help diagnosis and treatment.

     

    Dr Marcus Brown

    Dr. Brown, founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic and co-founder of the NOVA Cat Clinic, received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois. Currently the medical director for Alley Cat Allies and is an active supporter in local, state and national feline organizations such as: American Veterinary Dental Society, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brown also contributed the creation of the Association of Feline Practitioners’ 2009 Wellness Guidelines for Feline Practitioners.

    Dr. Brown enjoys continuing education and regularly attends seminars and conferences across the country focusing on the advancement in feline veterinary care. Dr. Brown also utilizes on-line discussion groups and veterinary networks to assist the clinic in maintaining the highest level of care and providing the newest treatments available in feline medicine.

    NOVA Cat Clinic
    923 N. Kenmore St.
    Arlington VA 22201

    Phone: 703-525-1955
    Fax: 703-525-1957
    Email: novacatclinic@gmail.com

    Website: http://novacatclinic.com/
    Facebook: Profile Page
    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

    More PostsWebsite

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