Name: Dr Michael Ray

Web Site: http://catclinicofroswell.com

Bio:

Dr. Ray is a Marietta Georgia native and graduate of Osborne High School. He received his bachelor of science at Georgia Southern University, and went on to graduate with his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Florida in 1997. After graduation, Dr. Ray completed an internship in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery at Animal Specialty Group in Los Angeles.

Dr. Ray has spent most of his career working in Feline Only hospitals, and is very excited to have the opportunity to own his own cat practice. Dr. Ray has been the Medical Director of The Cat Clinic of Roswell since March 2008.

The Cat Clinic of Roswell
1002 Canton Street
Roswell, GA 30075

Phone: 770-552-PURR (7877)
Fax: 770-552-8855
Email: info@catclinicofroswell.com

Website: http://www.catclinicofroswell.com/
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    Kittens, in their “formative weeks”

    April 6th, 2014

    training a kitten

    Kittens are born with their eyes closed and just basically sleep and nurse, and sometimes meow loudly. The queen stimulates their elimination, and they are completely dependent upon her for their first few weeks. They will communicate with the queen vocally on day 1; and by 4 days they can clumsily walk to their preferred teat for nursing. Because olfactory sensation is working very well right at birth, it is their main sense along with the tactile stimulation of touch, especially on their face. A feral queen can teach her kittens to be afraid of anything (especially humans) as early as 2 days old. There will be differences in socialization toward humans that extend into adulthood when a kitten spends these first few days with a truly feral mom! Eyes open around 7-10 days; and, between weeks 2 and 3, the ears open (although they do hear with closed ears by day 4) and those senses now contribute in the transition to the next phase, the development of the ultimate predator. Speaking of, those needle baby teeth begin to bud between weeks 2 and 3! Poor mom…

    The socialization phase is vitally important; and, it proceeds separately with each species. First and most importantly, cat on cat socialization is being learned. Kittens are responsible for all gait patterns, adult locomotion, and most body postures by weeks 6 to 7. So interacting with others begins immediately! Or it does not, based on the individual’s environment and exposure, and on a species to species basis. But remember that no experience equals a bad experience. So if a kitten is isolated early, their socialization could suffer greatly. Kittens that do not hang out with other cats at this young age will develop very little social skills for the group setting. They also learn by visual inspection, so grooming and even hunting skills (through play) are being learned as early as one month of age! Starting at 4 weeks, mom is getting sick of the nursing; but, sometimes she does not completely quit until they are 7-8 weeks of age. At the age of 2 months, most kittens are eating solid foods or prey items brought by mom. And studies have shown that the earlier they stop nursing, the more effective hunters they become! The budding stars are helping her eat her prey items by week 4, and stop nursing immediately. They will all follow the queen on her hunts by weeks 15- 18, and most kittens are self-sufficient predators by 6 months of age! Cats usually have a “specialty” or preference in what they hunt, and mom’s influence is huge in this decision.

    Now it is time to leave the house, especially for the young boys. And unless resources allow for succession planning, the little queens must also leave home! The best chance of any cat having a lifelong social mate is by teaming up with a littermate. These are often same sex pairs, 2 boys or 2-3 girls, in the barn cat setting. And though some genetic tendencies, like a “boldness gene”, do contribute these first few months are vital to shaping the level of socialization in each cat’s life. If they do not meet dogs until they are 6 months, the acceptance of a dog will be limited throughout their life. If you adopt a feral kitten that has had little to no human contact at the age of 6 months, socialization with humans may be greatly limited. So lots of exposure to a variety of animals and to a variety of people results in the most favorably socialized pet cats. And this process should begin as early as possible. Interestingly enough, the little toms become sexually mature as early as 6 months of age in the pet setting, or with the breeder, but as late as 18 months in the wild. I guess they have to put it on hold until they can fight for their right to mate? Or maybe it takes about a year to find a good place? Or maybe it is just like being a freshman in high school; none of the girls pay attention that year!

    A general rule of thumb in animals is that the longer time spent with their mother, the more intelligent the species. And although post-college children living at home may challenge that rule, it is generally true. So, as I often tell clients, the cat is more instinctual and predictable and intelligence is just not their game. Although some are smarter than others, the primal nature of their behavior is one of the most beautiful things they offer us as a species. They are simultaneously the perfect predator and a perfect model for meditation and yoga masters. They can be so peaceful as they rest and groom, and so seemingly vicious during a hunt. And we all know that no one consistently acts as cool as a cat. And on a pound for pound basis, they are the most powerful, the fastest and the most aggressive athlete that has ever lived… and number 2 is not even close! I am always amazed that this is all learned in 6 months, and a good chunk of it by 3 months! So enjoy kitten season and keep this information in mind during the formative weeks.

    Dr Michael Ray

    Dr. Ray is a Marietta Georgia native and graduate of Osborne High School. He received his bachelor of science at Georgia Southern University, and went on to graduate with his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Florida in 1997. After graduation, Dr. Ray completed an internship in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery at Animal Specialty Group in Los Angeles.

    Dr. Ray has spent most of his career working in Feline Only hospitals, and is very excited to have the opportunity to own his own cat practice. Dr. Ray has been the Medical Director of The Cat Clinic of Roswell since March 2008.

    The Cat Clinic of Roswell
    1002 Canton Street
    Roswell, GA 30075

    Phone: 770-552-PURR (7877)
    Fax: 770-552-8855
    Email: info@catclinicofroswell.com

    Website: http://www.catclinicofroswell.com/
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    Excessive Drooling

    June 4th, 2011

    When cats drool, we should always wonder what is causing this symptom.  Although some cats will drool when they are purring excessively and really comfortable, most drooling cats are having a problem that needs our attention.  An outdoor access kitty may have some of the most serious culprits to blame such as a broken jaw, or some other head trauma, including battles with other animals.  Indoor only cats can avoid these episodes but may still have reason to drool excessively.  In many cases the drooling is directly due to pain, so it  should be addressed immediately.

    Dental disease is the most common reason to drool for indoor only cats.  This type of drooling is often associated with a foul odor and sometimes even blood in the drool.  These additional findings at home absolutely dictate that the cat be examined immediately.  Most cats are not receiving home care (getting their teeth brushed daily!) and most owners do not inspect their cats teeth with any frequency at all.  Genetics are the primary factor in a cat’s tendency to develop dental disease and  some studies indicate as many as two thirds of cats have dental lesions by age 3.  Resorptive lesions of the teeth are the most common type of dental disease in a young cat.  In addition to these common resorptive lesions, we also see classic periodontal disease of the mouth where tartar has invaded the gum line and destroyed the periodontal ligament.  The difficulty of home care and the reluctance of cats to allow oral inspection dictate that they have an oral exam often; and, that we are proactive with dental prophylactic cleanings to identify and minimize these problems.  Drooling will commonly be seen with all forms of dental disease, including infectious stomatitis, peridontal disease and odontoclastic resorptive lesions.

    Another cause of drooling in an indoor only cat would include an oral mass.  We do see mouth cancer in cats and early treatment is crucial to success.  Unfortunately many oral cancers do not leave us with favorable treatment options.  These cats often have swelling of their face, and sometimes even a deviation of their normal jaw alignment.  If your cat allows, open and close their mouth as you look from the front.  The jaws should “go together” nicely and then we know the cat has proper dental occlusion.  Sometimes, periodontal disease will cause swelling of the face and poor dental occlusion.  A veterinarian can help you differentiate these causes upon oral exam.  Any excessive drooling should be seen by the doctor, especially if poor dental occlusion is noted. Mouth cancer is most common in older to middle aged cats, rarely seen before about 7-8 years of age.

    Indoor only cats sometimes get bored and I have seen foreign bodies lodged in the oral cavity.  I removed a sewing needle that had imbedded in the hard palate of a bored indoor only kitty.  I also removed a very stubborn twigg that had lodged in an outdoor access cat’s mouth.  Both if these cats had excessive drooling and the drool had begun to smell foul.  Fortunately, they both recovered very well.  It is worth mentioning that all causes of excessive drooling seen in the indoor only cat can also be seen with outdoor access kitties.

    The final cause of drooling to cover is drooling due to nausea.  Many cats are nauseous, even though they do not vomit.  Some cat doctors even go as far as to say that inappetance or anorexia is the most common sign of nausea.  Many of these cats will drool either periodically or consistently.  If a cat drools when food is placed in front of them, and they then do not consume the food, nausea should be considered.  Causes of nausea are numerous and many cases have multiple causes.  As you can see from this blog, a drooling cat should be seen by a veterinarian very soon after the symptom is noted.

    Dr Michael Ray

    Dr. Ray is a Marietta Georgia native and graduate of Osborne High School. He received his bachelor of science at Georgia Southern University, and went on to graduate with his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Florida in 1997. After graduation, Dr. Ray completed an internship in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery at Animal Specialty Group in Los Angeles.

    Dr. Ray has spent most of his career working in Feline Only hospitals, and is very excited to have the opportunity to own his own cat practice. Dr. Ray has been the Medical Director of The Cat Clinic of Roswell since March 2008.

    The Cat Clinic of Roswell
    1002 Canton Street
    Roswell, GA 30075

    Phone: 770-552-PURR (7877)
    Fax: 770-552-8855
    Email: info@catclinicofroswell.com

    Website: http://www.catclinicofroswell.com/
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    Directions: Google | MapQuest | Yahoo!

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