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Tips on Medicating Cats (Part 2 of 2)

Jun 9, 2012 by     1 Comment     Posted under: Tips & Advice

You can read part 1 here.

Some cats are more challenging, and none of the previous suggestions will work. Since our goal is getting the medicine into the cat, discuss with your veterinarian when things aren’t working so they can choose another option. “Compounded medications” may be more expensive, but can make life easier for you and your cat. Compounded medications may be available from your veterinarian or from a compounding pharmacy by prescription; your neighborhood pharmacy may not be able to do this. Some pharmacies will mail or ship medications to you.

Options include:

  • Flavored Chew Tablets
    We have found that beef-flavored metronidazole is working well for Katie!
  • Liquid Medications
    Chicken and fish are two popular flavors. Some cats will take the flavored liquid food mixed into their canned food, making it easy to have pet-sitters medicate your cat when you are away. If not, the oral liquid to squirt in the cat’s mouth can work well.
  • Transdermal Cream
    If your cat will not take anything mixed in food and won’t let you near their mouth, some medications can be formulated into a cream that you rub on the inner (pink) side of the cat’s ear. Methimazole for hyperthyroid cats can be formulated as a transdermal medication. The pharmacy will send syringes or “pens”, and you’ll squirt a measured amount onto a gloved finger (so you don’t medicate yourself!) to rub in your cat’s ear.
  • Injections
    Some cats tolerate a small needle and injection better than anything given by mouth. Again, not all medications are available this way, but if you’re having trouble, ask your veterinarian for help.

We know that giving medicines to cats can be very difficult, and the last thing we want is “Every time my cat sees me, s/he runs away”. So, if things aren’t going well – please contact your veterinarian to let them know. We want the best for your cat – and for you.

Flavored tablets, liquids and some can even be administered as a “transdermal cream”, to rub on the inside (pink part) of the cat’s ears. Some medications are available in injectable form, like giving insulin with a tiny syringe and needle. Since our goal is getting the medicine into the cat, discuss with your veterinarian when things aren’t working so they can choose another option. Compounded medications may be more expensive, but can make life easier for you and your cat.

Dr Dale Rubenstein

Dr. Rubenstein opened the doors of A Cat Clinic, the first all-feline veterinary practice in Montgomery County, in 1986. She earned her BA in Biology from Oberlin College, her MS in Nutritional Biochemistry from the University of Maryland and her DVM from Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine. She became board certified in feline practice, one of only 80 diplomats in the U.S., through the American Board of Veterinary Practices (ABVP) in 1996 and re-certified in 2006.

Dr. Rubenstein is also a member of the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP), American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), Maryland Veterinary Medical Association (MVMA), Cornell Feline Health Center, Montgomery County Humane Society Feline Focus Committee, Montgomery County Veterinary Medicine Association, as well as a member of the credentialing committee of the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners (ABVP).

A Cat Clinic, Boyds, MD
14200 Clopper Road,
Boyds, MD 20841

Phone: 301-540-7770
Fax: 301-540-2041
Email: messages@acatclinic.us

Website: http://www.acatclinic.us/
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